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About Deviant Member RobertMacQuarrie1Male/Canada Group :icontoonworld-mundotoon: ToonWorld-MundoToon
turn back life the childhood
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Spider-Man vs Mysterio by RobertMacQuarrie1
Spider-Man vs Mysterio
Another one of Spider-Man's most popular enemies, ol' fishbowl head also offers another unique challenge to Spider-Man.

With Mysterio, Spider-Man faces a different sort of challenge.  Mysterio doesn't offer a purely physical challenge to Spider-Man.  He doesn't have the shapeshifting talents of Sandman, the raw elemental power of Electro, or the telescoping tentacles of Doctor Octopus.  All he has is his mind, which makes his battles with Spider-Man far more cerebral in nature.  For Mysterio, it's not about out-FIGHTING Spider-Man, it's out-THINKING him.  He is the only one to challenge Spider-Man purely on an intellectual level.  It's about obfuscation, mystery, and illusion rather than a straight up fight.  Mysterio doesn't just want to kill Spider-Man- he wants to BREAK him first. 

And, unlike all the other villains, Mysterio stands out because he was the only one to challenge Spider-Man first rather than have Spider-Man come after him.  And he did so in an ingenious way.  Posing as Spider-Man, Mysterio framed him for several crimes, turning the public further against him.  Then, when he appeared as Mysterio for the first time, he was able to play the "hero" to Spider-Man's "villain."  And he used his special effects skills to make it seem like he had Spider-Man's abilities beat.  Again, it was not a physical battle for Spidey, but an intellectual one.  It was a chess match between the two, and once Spidey figured it out, he was able to out-think his opponent.  

And, as I stated before, the best Spidey villains hold up a dark mirror to the web-slinger himself.  With Mysterio, he reflects Spider-Man's sense of showmanship and grandstanding.  The world is a stage for Mysterio, and he HAS to be the main attraction, to outshine Spider-Man who often makes himself the center of attention. 
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Spider-Man vs The Vulture by RobertMacQuarrie1
Spider-Man vs The Vulture
Another one of Spider-Man's rogue's gallery, this time offering the web-slinger a very different challenge than his other opponents.

The thing with the Vulture is that he really isn't a physical match for Spider-Man.  Spider-Man has youth, strength, and considerable speed on his side.  So why is it that the Vulture is such a persistent foe?

This partially has to do with again what I feel makes a good Spider-Man villain- they are Spider-Man's dark mirror.  But the Vulture isn't a reflection of who Spider-Man would be if he used his powers for his own gain, but if he used his own inventive intellect for criminal ends.  The Vulture may seem frail, but he was able to manufacture his own flying harness, showing that he has a considerable intellect of his own.  Not enough to match Peter's, but still formidable enough on his own. 

And while he may only have the power of flight, the Vulture has also shown a cunning tactical mind and surprising ruthless streak to win any battle.  After his first battle with Spider-Man, the Vulture actually figured out how Spider-Man beat him, and devised a strategy to lure Spidey into a false sense of security and strike while his guard was down.  Which worked surprisingly well, as the Vulture was the first villain to seriously injure Spider-Man, forcing the wall-crawler to engage him in their next battle while sporting an injured soldier.  And in most of their battles afterwards, the Vulture would find a way to use his power of flight to overcome his other tactical weaknesses.  And, failing that, the Vulture would often just up and pull a gun on Spidey, once again showing his ruthlessness and his tactical sense- when all is said and done, a bullet is just as good as any other method to kill Spidey.

On another note, this drawing and my last one with the Sandman were the first time I really took a stab at drawing buildings.  So if they look a little off, my apologies, as I'm still learning.
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Spider-Man vs Sandman by RobertMacQuarrie1
Spider-Man vs Sandman
Another one of Spider-Man's toughest adversaries.

As I stated with Electro, the best Spider-Man villains I feel hold up a dark mirror to Spider-Man's actions.  They use their abilities with reckless abandon, benefiting their own interests and desires, rather than for a general sense of a greater responsibility to others and the world around them.  Sandman, I feel, fits this theme fairly well. 

With Electro, it's about what if Spider-Man used his abilities for financial gain and towards criminal ends.  With Sandman, I feel it shows what Spider-Man would be like if he used his abilities simply for his own amusement.  Flint Marko seems less like someone with grand criminal ambitions and simply someone who uses his abilities to do whatever he wants, whenever he wants it.  Yes, this includes robbing banks.  But it also means using his abilities for petty, miniscule things.  In his first appearance, Sandman was escaping the police and took refuge in Peter's school and eventually his science class.  Finding himself in school, Flint Marko insisted that the teacher give him a diploma since he never got his GED.  Here is a man with the power to challenge the likes of the Hulk and the Thing, and he was using his abilities to bully someone into getting a high school diploma. 

It's also important to note that the Sandman best emphasizes the qualities that I think make a good villain for Spider-Man- namely that Spidey's powers are enough to get him INTO trouble, but not enough to get him OUT of it.  With the Sandman, Spidey can't overwhelm him with sheer brute force.  Marko may not be a world class genius, but he's smart enough to use his abilities to the best of his advantage.  This again forces Spidey to find a way around the Sandman's impressive shapeshifting abilities and once again beat him with his brain rather than his fists.

A funny thing about Sandman is that, for a good long while, he wasn't really a Spider-Man villain and was more of a Fantastic Four villain.  He appeared more in their book, sporting his GOD-AWFUL masked costume as a member of the Frightful Four, to the point where during the very first Marvel Team-Up story, Spider-Man tried to pass the Sandman off to the Human Torch since he reasoned that the Sandman as more "their" problem than his own. 

But, yeah, striped shirt all the way.
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Spider-Man vs Electro by RobertMacQuarrie1
Spider-Man vs Electro
I said that I hoped this would be a series, so here I am again with another in the "Spidey Vs" series.

Everyone has their favorite Spider-Man villains.  Sure, we can agree in the importance of some of the bigger ones.  Green Goblin stands at the top of the rankings.  Doctor Octopus is one of his most important.  So is my personal favorite, Venom.  But coming in a close second to me is Electro.

To me, Spider-Man has the best rogue's gallery in comics, even trumping Batman's.  That is because I find that not only do the villains offer a significant physical challenge for Spider-Man on multiple levels, but also because they hold up a dark mirror to Spider-Man as a character.  We know with Spider-Man, with great power must also come great responsibility.  But with villains like Electro, we see what happens when there is no sense of responsibility with that great power.

When I read Electro's first appearance, I was struck with his casual indifference to his actions.  He didn't care that people could be hurt or possibly killed by his actions or inaction.  It didn't matter to him that a lineman would die if he didn't act, or if Spider-Man was seriously hurt after he touched him.  To Electro, he was just looking out for number one (sound familiar?).  To me, he epitomized what Spider-Man could be had he used his powers for his own selfish gain, to earn money rather than to help others. 

In addition, Electro's powers always offered a difficult challenge to Peter.  He could strike from a distance, putting Spider-Man on the ropes.  His electric bolts always put Spider-Man's speed and agility to the test.  And Spider-Man couldn't touch him, lest endanger his own life.  Spidey had to be smarter than Electro, rather than tougher. 

Plus, and I know I'm in the minority, but I LOVE the starfish mask.  It's one of my favorite designs.  Screw the generic electric blue Electro- give me starfish mask Electro every time.
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So, we're back to doing this again:

www.bleedingcool.com/2014/12/t…

www.bleedingcool.com/2014/12/i…

This sort of thing really pisses me off.  This continual blame of a certain aspect of fandom for expressing said fandom in a different way than what some may be familiar with.  To make enemies out of people who, let's face it, aren't harming anyone. 

Look, I'm not a cosplayer.  But just because someone decides to dress up in a costume to go to a convention doesn't automatically make them into a fame obsessed, egotistical attention whore who knows nothing about the character they are dressing up as.  Trust me, if these people JUST wanted attention, there are FAR easier ways to get it other than spending weeks if not months, and hundreds if not thousands of dollars on costumes.  This is NOT an inexpensive hobby. 

Now we've gotten into the "sales" aspects of things, with retailers at the shows blaming cosplayers for not spending money at their booths.  Or not knowing enough about the characters to apparently match their supposed ideal of what fans are supposed to know. 
 
But I'm a bit familiar with sales, and I know that, to be successful, you can't just sit back and wait for sales to come to you.  You need to go out and SELL!!!  Meet with people, ask questions, find out what people want.  And I've been to plenty of conventions, and the one thing that I can tell you is that the people manning these booths- for the large part- don't engage their customers.  They don't ask them what they want.  They don't talk to them, unless it's about how much something is and where to pay.  Now, granted, these are busy shows.  But if you're booth isn't doing a lot of business, maybe you should go out and ENGAGE to bolster sales.

And you know who might be easy marks?  How about those people DRESSED UP IN COSTUMES!!!  That guy dressed up as Hellboy?  How about asking him if he is looking for any Hellboy merchandise?  That girl dressed up as Sailor Moon?  How about asking her if she's looking for any anime, or art books to use as reference guides?  Seriously, someone dressing up should be an EASY way to determine WHAT they are interested in.  But instead it just paints them as easy targets for a small number of businesses that don't want to admit their lack of business acumen.  You can bet that a few of these types of booths are the types of shop owners who probably ignore their own customers in their own stores, and would probably use their station behind the cash register as a podium to spout off their views to people who just want to pay for their damn comic already. 

Because here's the thing- these conventions that these booth owners are selling at?  They're not going away.  In fact, more and more people are showing up every year.  So that means that there are a LOT of fans going there, and a LOT of potential customers.  If you're not managing to find a way to sell to this audience, that is CLEARLY interested in the material that YOU are selling in one way or another, then you might need to take a good long hard look at not what the customers are doing wrong, but what YOU are doing wrong in not building your business. 

And let's face it- these shows aren't cheap.  A four day pass at some places can cost over a hundred dollars.  And then there is transportation fees if it is out of town for some people.  Costs for staying at a hotel if they are coming in from out of town.  Trust me, it can get expensive even if you AREN'T a cosplayer.  Some people may not have jobs that give them a lot of disposable income, and especially not enough to drop $250 for a Dragonzord toy (That one could get for $75.00 at a Toys R' Us just a few months prior).  And then when it comes to cosplayers, there's the additional expense on top of that.  So by the time these fans get to the conventions, they may not have ANY money to spend on the overpriced merchandise a lot of these guys may be hocking from behind their tables where they just sit back, and wait for the sales to come to them, rather than actively trying to engage people.

Sorry that this is a bit of a ramble, but I'm just sick and tired of people trying to insist that there is only ONE type of way to be a fan.  That someone has to meet certain conditions if they want to be considered "real" fans, and are blamed for stupid things for bad sales at shows that show record attendance. 

There is no "one" way to be a fan.  If this means dressing up in costume, or just wearing a Flash T-Shirt while out on errands, no one is wrong as long as they aren't harming anyone by doing it.  This isn't a problem that the fandom has.  This is a problem that a small few have with the fandom, which isn't nearly the same thing. 

Robert MacQuarrie
So, we're back to doing this again:

www.bleedingcool.com/2014/12/t…

www.bleedingcool.com/2014/12/i…

This sort of thing really pisses me off.  This continual blame of a certain aspect of fandom for expressing said fandom in a different way than what some may be familiar with.  To make enemies out of people who, let's face it, aren't harming anyone. 

Look, I'm not a cosplayer.  But just because someone decides to dress up in a costume to go to a convention doesn't automatically make them into a fame obsessed, egotistical attention whore who knows nothing about the character they are dressing up as.  Trust me, if these people JUST wanted attention, there are FAR easier ways to get it other than spending weeks if not months, and hundreds if not thousands of dollars on costumes.  This is NOT an inexpensive hobby. 

Now we've gotten into the "sales" aspects of things, with retailers at the shows blaming cosplayers for not spending money at their booths.  Or not knowing enough about the characters to apparently match their supposed ideal of what fans are supposed to know. 
 
But I'm a bit familiar with sales, and I know that, to be successful, you can't just sit back and wait for sales to come to you.  You need to go out and SELL!!!  Meet with people, ask questions, find out what people want.  And I've been to plenty of conventions, and the one thing that I can tell you is that the people manning these booths- for the large part- don't engage their customers.  They don't ask them what they want.  They don't talk to them, unless it's about how much something is and where to pay.  Now, granted, these are busy shows.  But if you're booth isn't doing a lot of business, maybe you should go out and ENGAGE to bolster sales.

And you know who might be easy marks?  How about those people DRESSED UP IN COSTUMES!!!  That guy dressed up as Hellboy?  How about asking him if he is looking for any Hellboy merchandise?  That girl dressed up as Sailor Moon?  How about asking her if she's looking for any anime, or art books to use as reference guides?  Seriously, someone dressing up should be an EASY way to determine WHAT they are interested in.  But instead it just paints them as easy targets for a small number of businesses that don't want to admit their lack of business acumen.  You can bet that a few of these types of booths are the types of shop owners who probably ignore their own customers in their own stores, and would probably use their station behind the cash register as a podium to spout off their views to people who just want to pay for their damn comic already. 

Because here's the thing- these conventions that these booth owners are selling at?  They're not going away.  In fact, more and more people are showing up every year.  So that means that there are a LOT of fans going there, and a LOT of potential customers.  If you're not managing to find a way to sell to this audience, that is CLEARLY interested in the material that YOU are selling in one way or another, then you might need to take a good long hard look at not what the customers are doing wrong, but what YOU are doing wrong in not building your business. 

And let's face it- these shows aren't cheap.  A four day pass at some places can cost over a hundred dollars.  And then there is transportation fees if it is out of town for some people.  Costs for staying at a hotel if they are coming in from out of town.  Trust me, it can get expensive even if you AREN'T a cosplayer.  Some people may not have jobs that give them a lot of disposable income, and especially not enough to drop $250 for a Dragonzord toy (That one could get for $75.00 at a Toys R' Us just a few months prior).  And then when it comes to cosplayers, there's the additional expense on top of that.  So by the time these fans get to the conventions, they may not have ANY money to spend on the overpriced merchandise a lot of these guys may be hocking from behind their tables where they just sit back, and wait for the sales to come to them, rather than actively trying to engage people.

Sorry that this is a bit of a ramble, but I'm just sick and tired of people trying to insist that there is only ONE type of way to be a fan.  That someone has to meet certain conditions if they want to be considered "real" fans, and are blamed for stupid things for bad sales at shows that show record attendance. 

There is no "one" way to be a fan.  If this means dressing up in costume, or just wearing a Flash T-Shirt while out on errands, no one is wrong as long as they aren't harming anyone by doing it.  This isn't a problem that the fandom has.  This is a problem that a small few have with the fandom, which isn't nearly the same thing. 

Robert MacQuarrie

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:iconmr-redx:
mr-redx Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2014  Student General Artist
Hey man! I had some cool ideas for your next Amalgams if you are interested?:)
Reply
:iconrobertmacquarrie1:
RobertMacQuarrie1 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2014
Thanks for the offer, but I'm not really taking requests.  I'd prefer to use my own ideas for the amalgam concepts.

However, if you'd like to commission me for a drawing, I'd be happy to send you my rates.
Reply
:iconlockett730:
lockett730 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2014
hey if your ever interested check out our site and display your original characters and there bios here.

newheroesdatabase.wifeo.com/

www.facebook.com/newheroesdata…

thanks Rodney
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:iconsewing0109:
SEwing0109 Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Are you on Twitter?
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:iconrobertmacquarrie1:
RobertMacQuarrie1 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2014
Yes, but I don't post much.  It'll be months between when I would post something.
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:iconsewing0109:
SEwing0109 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Just wondering. I love your comic strips!
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:icondeathchrist2000:
deathchrist2000 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2014  Student Writer
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:iconrobertmacquarrie1:
RobertMacQuarrie1 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2014
Just saw it.

It's an alternate reality tale. 
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:icondeathchrist2000:
deathchrist2000 Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2014  Student Writer
Reply
:iconahochrein2010:
AHochrein2010 Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2014  Professional General Artist
You do awesome work!
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